Social Justice Warriors Are Not Ruining Science Fiction!

So hear’s the thing… I am frequently running into fans of science fiction who are half my age and proport to be more knowledgeable about the genre than I, and what’s more, they can explain to me exactly why it’s all going straight to hell.

To cut to the chase of their rather lengthy arguments, they claim that social justice warriors (SJWs) are destroying all that’s good in science fiction. Now,  whoever these SJW may, or may not, be the complaint is that science fiction will never recover from vandalism done in the name of diversity. Which leaves me with just one question, WHAT ARE THESE PUNKS SMOKING?

From my old-fart-fan point of view, science fiction has always been about diversity. Don’t believe me? Star Trek, of course, went out of its way to ensure the Enterprise had a diverse crew (don’t believe me? Watch a few other shows of that era). Or you could read Joe Haldeman’s The Forever War released in 1974 which takes place in a future where homosexuality is more acceptable than heterosexuality.  Robert A. Heinline’s characters, of course, are often in polygamous marriages which are considered normal in his future.  And even in old Flash Gordon, there was an occasional flash of feminism as Dr. Zarkov defends Dale Arden as a talented radio operator who must be included on the missions.

In short, science fiction has always been and always will be about pushing societies envelope. Today, I can recommend D. Wallace Peach’s Bonewall and highly recommend the Jurisdiction series by Susan R. Matthews. Both are carrying on the long and proud SF tradition of pushing our social envelopes and make for good reads.

So, no, I have no idea what are these fanboys complaining about when they moan about SJWs ruining science fiction. These still are the good old days and I for one intend to enjoy them.

By Clayton J. Callahan

 

D. Wallace Peach Simply Can Not Write a Bad Book

I’ve been a fan of this author for a long time. Her fantasy and science fiction display a beautiful use of the English language coupled with great storytelling.  For those not already in the know, I recommend you give The Bonewall a try. But beware, The Bonewall is as dark as it is compelling; a richly textured journey through a post-apocalyptic nightmare that nonetheless shines through with human goodness and hope.

However, for her latest work, “The Peach” has taken a completely different direction and man is it worth it!

She’s just written a children’s book! Frankly, I’m always excited when an author breaks new ground and challenges themselves with a different medium. This is why I’ve occasionally broken away from science fiction to do other genres, and I always find I’m a better writer when I come back. D. Wallace Peach has now done this and done it well with Grumpy Ann And The Monsters. It’s a cute introduction for the wee ones into the fascinating world of science fiction through a very personal and uplifting tale.

I found her poetry endearing and her artwork (which Peach did all herself) charming. If you have kids from about four to six years old in your orbit. I highly recommend you start them out right in science fiction with this little gem.

https://www.amazon.com/Grumpy-Ana-Grouchy-Monsters-Childrens/dp/1975723945/ref=sr_1_fkmr1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1514316075&sr=1-2-fkmr1&keywords=grumpy+ann+and+the+monsters

The Socerer’s Garden #Free on #Kindle

Sorcerer's Garden 2

Yep, a little more promotion.

Free 10/25 – 10/27

 Click Here for Amazon

I want to thank each reader who graciously supported me by purchasing the book, despite knowing that at some point it would likely pop up as a freebie for a few days. The gesture is lovingly appreciated for all it signifies.

Each review is a gift and results in a spontaneous happy dance. Somewhere, someone is taking the time to gather thoughts, click over to Amazon, and share an opinion with other readers. Here’s what a few reviewers are saying:

Interesting Fantasy Read!
“The Sorcerer’s Garden” by D. Wallace Peach is a truly unique and interesting read. The story seems ordinary at first but quickly takes an epic fantasy turn. The main character is a 28-year-old named Madlyn who is not having the greatest luck with her relationships or her career. By chance, she gets a new job that involves reading to a man who is in a vegetative state. Madlyn thinks the job will be boring and mundane but it turns into so much more as Madlyn is literally sucked into the book that she’s reading the man. She appears as a princess in the story and faces off against others that she knows in real life. The author then takes readers on an unforgettable back-and-forth journey between “real life” Madlyn and the Madlyn in the storybook.

I find it very hard to describe “The Sorcerer’s Garden” because of the back-and-forth and unique storyline but would recommend it to fantasy and adventure genre fans. The author does a good job creating a world of interesting characters and not only showing them in one setting, such as the real world but also in the book setting that the main character is reading. I look forward to reading more from D. Wallace Peach after reading this book.